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NYC’s Homeless Prepare to Once Again be Mistaken for NYU Art Students

As the autumnal air ripples through a September sky, local homeless people are again preparing an arsenal of responses for being mistaken for NYU’s art students. 

“I just hate it when I’m walking down the street, minding my own business, and someone not-so-subtly whispers that ‘I won’t make it.’” Hanley Braddison, a local homeless man/used yarn salesman, said angrily. “I wish people would stop thinking I’m above them and am something I’m not. The closest thing I get to making art everyday is doodling on my sign.”

Braddison is but one of many homeless residents who believe that many art students’ sense of style takes too much from the underprivileged. The similarities are now at the point where cases of mistaken identity are nearly an everyday occurrence. It’s a development that hasn’t been beneficial for the community.

Says Braddison, “Honestly, I can deal with the empty Goodwill stores, the trash rummaging, and the gentrification. But I just wish they weren’t all so annoying. Like, nobody likes them. Nobody.”

In response to the mounting claims of misappropriation of financially-impoverished aestheticism, President of the Student Activists for Artistic Altruism Association (SAAAA), Jenji Bingo, released a statement earlier today. Outlining her “dedication to improve universal social wellbeing through localized artistic embodiment, aesthetic disassociation, and habitual public re-awareness”,  she went on to say, “We understand what it’s like to be part of an underprivileged community. Probably better than anyone else, even the homeless. As an artist, you witness your creative ideals rejected, misinterpreted, and passed over for funding. It provides a level of marginalization that few other groups, if any, can fully identify with.”

Braddison was set to release a response to SAAAA’s statement but had to reschedule to find somewhere to sleep tonight.

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