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5 Very Believable Conspiracies that Prove Rutgers Should’ve Beat Penn State Last Weekend

As we all know, Rutgers lost to Penn State this weekend, finishing the game with a not-as-bad-as-it-could-have-been 35-6. But we’re not settling with this. We think Rutgers was supposed to win against Penn State after a series of deals and of course, destiny. Here’s why:

5.) Rutgers Football Coach Chris Ash slipped, big time:
After Rutgers lost to Penn State, Chris Ash did some interviews. Here, he revealed some concerning information. “Last year, in 2016, we had a lot of problems. We couldn’t play special teams, and you look at our football team now, I would say we’ve improved in a lot of those areas,” Ash said. “I would say we’ve improved in a lot of those areas”: Doesn’t that sound like something a winner would say? Chris Ash planned this statement. Because his team was supposed to win, a representation of the years’ improvement. And when Rutgers lost against Penn State 35-6, Ash was left shocked–with nothing to say but his pre-planned words.

4.) Rutgers lost 6-35, but Penn State won 35-6? What?:
This can’t just be a coincidence. On the SAME day (November 11, 2017) that Rutgers lost to Penn State 6-35, Penn State WON against Rutgers 35-6. See that? Those are the same numbers but reversed. It’s uncanny. Something like this doesn’t just happen in every football game. It’s an anomaly. It must mean something, and The Black Sheep isn’t going to let this oddity slip through the cracks. Rutgers and Penn State are undoubtedly intertwined by fate, through the story that these numbers tell.

3.) Chris Ash probably paid Manny Bowen a lot of cash:
Penn State’s starting linebacker Manny Bowen was mysteriously out of uniform this Saturday in the game against Rutgers. Bowen reportedly missed the game after a failure to comply with the rules, whatever that means. Now, Bowen could’ve just broken the rules without a direct desire to screw with his team’s chances of winning, but a few things need to be considered before we assume the obvious. Bowen had a particularly good 2017. He made 51 tackles this year, leading him to be in the top three of Penn State’s tacklers.

Doesn’t it make sense that Rutgers took a strategic risk to remove one of PSU’s star players from the field??? Could it be that with all that extra tuition money lying around, Rutgers paid Bowen to break the rules and should’ve resulted in a win? We find this star player’s sudden dismissal of the rules dubious.

2.) Rutgers is the birthplace of college football, after all:
This is everything. Rutgers is college football’s daddy. Its papa, if you will. We are the father. Therefore, we should actually win every game, because of like, respecting your elders and shit. Also, birthplace has 10 letters. Rutgers has seven. 7+10= 17, which is more than what Rutgers football got against Penn State, which means that something is very wrong here. We were supposed to get at least 17 points during this game. And Penn State is not where college football was born, so it should have gotten zero.

1.) Hmmmmmmm? High fives in football?:

Look at this image. It looks like normal dudes playing football, right? Wrong. Zoom in closer. Enhance the image. ENHANCE.

Here we see two players from two different teams. Penn State and Rutgers. Sworn enemies. Look closely at the Scarlet player’s hand. It’s outstretched towards the Penn State player. Like a high five. That’s right, this Scarlet Knight extended a friendly gesture towards his supposed sworn enemy in the middle of the field. Why do this sort of thing unless some sort of mutual agreement occurred? Rutgers is promised that they will win the game, and in return, Penn State gets to be the beloved underdog.

Unfortunately, for reasons unknown, Penn State did not follow through on their commitment. We may never know why Penn State let us down, but we hope these theories help the world know that Rutgers really was supposed to win on November 11, 2017. Really.

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